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Monarchs of the NileNew Revised Edition$
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Aidan Dodson

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9789774167164

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.5743/cairo/9789774167164.001.0001

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date: 23 April 2017

The Rise and Fall of the Libyan Pharaohs

The Rise and Fall of the Libyan Pharaohs

Chapter:
(p.145) 15 The Rise and Fall of the Libyan Pharaohs
Source:
Monarchs of the Nile
Author(s):

Aidan Dodson

Publisher:
American University in Cairo Press
DOI:10.5743/cairo/9789774167164.003.0015

This chapter explores the Libyan pharaohs of the Twenty-second and Twenty-third dynasties. It considers the oddity of the Libyan heritage of the rulers within this period—Libyans had been among the foes of Merenptah and Rameses III, but there is no evidence of any kind of violent takeover when Osorkon (the Elder), the son of the Libyan chief of the Ma (Meshwesh) tribe, Shoshenq A, took over the throne. There are other similar instances of Libyan heritage among the successors of Herihor and Panedjem I. Regardless of these circumstances, the Twenty-second Dynasty would come to an end and the nephew of the late King Osorkon, Shoshenq I, would ascend as the first Libyan monarch of the new era.

Keywords:   Twenty-second Dynasty, Twenty-third Dynasty, Libyan pharaohs, Shoshenq I, Osorkon II, Horsieset I, Shoshenq III, Takelot II, Padubast I, Osorkon III

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