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The success paradoxWhy we need a holistic theory of social mobility$
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Graeme Atherton

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781447316336

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447316336.001.0001

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date: 27 June 2017

A new politics of social mobility

A new politics of social mobility

Chapter:
(p.141) Eight A new politics of social mobility
Source:
The success paradox
Author(s):

Graeme Atherton

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447316336.003.0008

This chapter considers what a new politics of social mobility could look like. The notion that there is something wrong in the early 21st century due to a combination of marketisation, materialism and technology is a familiar refrain in the early 2010s. The notion creates the space for this new politics. It is particularly pertinent to younger generations who increasingly feel they are sharing a disproportionate burden of the economic challenges many European countries are facing and are increasingly disillusioned by the mainstream political offering. This new politics is one of the centre and not the margins. It needs to ask: How should school prepare young people for work and life? What is the point of Higher Education? How do I be a ‘good parent? How can work be more fulfilling (and remunerative)? What does a good work: life’ balance mean? How can inequality be reduced? Why should elites be more diverse? How important is being healthy? What should the state provide and who for? And how can my future and that of my family and/or children be more secure, successful and happy?

Keywords:   young people elites, technology, marketisation, materialism

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